Category: Movies and Documentaries

Bloody Sunday

Bloody Sunday

Bloody Sunday (Hells Kitchen/Granada, 2002), directed by Paul Greengrass, was inspired by Don Mullan’s book, ‘Eyewitness Bloody Sunday’. Mullan was co-producer and, at the request of the director, had a cameo role as a Bogside priest.

The movie went on to win several international awards including Sundance and the Berlin Golden Bear.

Following the success of Bloody Sunday, Greengrass asked Don to work with him on the movie Omagh.

Bloody Sunday launched Paul Greengrass into a successful Hollywood career.

Official Trailer

Bloody Sunday on Wikipedia

Don Mullan discusses Bloody Sunday at DePaul University, Chicago, USA

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Omagh

Omagh

(Hells Kitchen/Channel Four Films) 2004

On the 15 August 1998 a Real IRA car bomb exploded in the busy market town of Omagh, Co. Tyrone. Its intention was to destabilise the fledgling Northern Ireland Peace Process. 29 people perished, including a mother pregnant with twin, with hundreds maimed and injured in what remains the greatest loss of life in a single incident related to the ‘Troubles’.

The suffering of the families was compounded when they discovered the intelligence services had been informed that Omagh was being targeted. The movie explores the role of the Omagh Support Group in pursuing the perpetrators and holding the authorities accountable for a tragedy they might have stopped.

The decision to make the movie Omagh was based on a 105-page report which Don Mullan wrote at the request of director Paul Greengrass and Tiger Aspect Films (London), based on his encounter with all of the families bereaved in the horrific bombing. The writing of that report remains one of the most harrowing tasks ever undertaken by Mullan.

Mullan was co-producer of the movie which also won several international prizes including the San Sabastian and Toronto Film Festivals.

Official Trailer

Omagh on Wikipedia

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Five Minutes of Heaven

Five Minutes of Heaven

(BBC/Element Films/Bord Scannán na hÉirean) 2009

Five Minutes of Heaven  is the third of the trilogy of international award-winning movies which Mullan played influential roles in producing about the beginning (Bloody Sunday 1972), end (Omagh 1998), and aftermath of the Northern Ireland ‘Troubles’ (Five Minutes of Heaven, 2009). The latter explores the complex issues associated with reconciliation and forgiveness in a post-conflict society.

The screenwriter of Omagh, Guy Hibbert, recommended that the makers of Five Minutes of Heaven engage the services of Don Mullan. Mullan was Associate Producer, playing a key role in securing the cooperation, and retaining the confidence, of Joe Griffin, played by James Nesbitt in the movie. Griffin, as a 10-year-old boy witnessed the murder of his 19-year-old brother, Jim, at the hands of 17-year-old loyalist, Alistair Little in 1975. Little, played by Liam Neeson, also co-operated in the making of the movie.

Mullan clashed with director Oliver Hirschbiegel at the conclusion of the filmmaking process, objecting strongly to the director’s ending. Despite the fact that Mullan had been invited to view a ‘locked’ version of the movie at Ardmore Studios, Co. Wicklow, his intervention forced a change of emphasis before the movie was released. Mullan, in a letter written to the movie’s Producers and Executive Producers, argued that Hierschbiegel’s ending would be a betrayal of the trust that Joe Griffin and Alastair Little had invested in the filmmakers, as well as a skewed understanding of the nature of reconciliation in a post-conflict society. The German director’s ending suggested that the victim was, in this instance, liberated by the perpetrator, a conclusion that Mullan knew neither Little nor Griffin would ascribe to.

While Alastair Little was prepared to meet Joe Griffin during the process of making the movie, Joe Griffin found himself unable to meet his brother’s killer. Referring to the psychological damage the murder did to his mother, who later blamed her young son for not stopping Little, Griffin told Mullan, “I can forgive Alastair for what he did to Jim. But I can’t forgive him for what he did to my mother and what my mother did to me.”

Five Minutes of Heaven premiered at the 25th Sundance Film Festival, winning the World Cinema Dramatic Directing Award and the World Cinema Screenwriting Award.

Official Trailer

Five Minutes of Heaven – Insider Briefing

Five Minutes of Heaven on IMDb

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Documentaries

Documentaries

Between 1999–2002 Mullan made a series of ten television documentaries for Ireland’s TV3 flagship current affairs programme, 20/20, covering the following themes:

  1. Sr. Helen Prejean and the Death Penalty
  2. Kim Phuc (The little girl burning with napalm in the 1972 iconic Vietnam photograph) visits Richard Moore and Clare Gallagher (who lost her eyesight in the 1998 Omagh Bomb)
  3. In the Game of the Father (European Champion boxer, Charlie Nash, and his sons)
  4. The Murder of Seamus Ludlow
  5. The Dublin and Monaghan Bombings (Part 1)
  6. The Dublin and Monaghan Bombings (Part 2)
  7. Bloody Sunday: The Right to Truth (Part 1)
  8. Bloody Sunday: (Part 2)
  9. Dr. Deirdre Killelea of The Panda Foundation (Helping children with ADHD)
  10. Millvina Dean, Titanic Survivor
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